27th Dec2014

Million Dollar Arm – DVD

by timbaros

MILLION DOLLAR ARMTwo young men are plucked from their small Indian village to become major league baseball players in Disney’s newest feel good film Million Dollar Arm.

Jon Hamm stars as JB Bernstein – a not very successful sports agent who needs to find a way to make money to save his company, and his career. JB and his right hand man Aash (Aasif Mandvi) are not having any luck in signing NFL player Popo Vanauta, so JB, while watching Britain’s Got Talent at home (with Susan Boyle singing for Simon Cowell) has a lightbulb idea – find a young cricketer with a fast arm and turn him into a baseball star. JB and Aash hear about a very rich Asian businessman, Chang (Tzi Ma), who’s looking to invest in Asian-based athletes. So JB pitches their idea to him – a contest to be called Million Dollar Arm. Chang gives them one year, and money, to pull it off. So JB puts his Los Angeles bachelor life on hold – including liaisons with models – and leaves his house (and washing machine) in the care of Brenda (Lake Bell), a doctor who his backyard.

JB then heads to India where he starts to assemble a team to help him with the contest. He can’t say no to Amit Rohan (a very good Pitobash Tripathy), a baseball fanatic who practically begs JB to help him. Fliers are made announcing the contest, and it becomes very big news in India. Young boys pass fliers from village to village, and young men from different backgrounds show an interest in the contest – the nation is excited about the prospect of one of their own being picked to be a major league baseball player. JB enlists the help of baseball scout Ray (Alan Arkin), one of the best baseball scouts in the business. Two young men in particular take part in the contest – Dinesh (Madhur Mittal) – who wants to stay loyal to his father by taking over the family’s trucking business yet sees the contest as a great opportunity, and Rinku (Suraj Sharma) – who has one of the fastest pitches JB has ever seen. So with contests taking place in various cities in India, it’s both Dinesh and Rinku who wind up being the dual winners, winning cash prizes and a once in a lifetime and life changing opportunity – to go to America to prepare to become major league baseball players. The young men have never left their rural villages so upon arriving in America, everything is foreign to them, including escalators, modern technology and the food (pizza!). Amit comes along as a sort of chaperone to the men and as an assistant to JB. They live with JB where they set up a praying temple in one of his bedrooms. They also prepare an Indian meal in the backyard for him and Brenda – realizing that there is a spark between the two.

Having never played baseball before, both Dinesh and Rinku initially struggle to play the game. Sure, they can pitch fast, but there’s more to baseball than pitching. They need to pitch straight into the pitchers glove with the goal of striking out the players. It takes several weeks for the young men to learn the game, and once they do, JB trotts them out to the scouts of some of the major league teams (with the press in full attendance as well). But the boys disappoint, their pitching is all over the place, and not as fast as they needed to be. So JB, with the help of Pitobash’s enthusiasm and rousing speech to the two young men, hold another exhibition, and this time Dinesh and Rinku impress all in attendance, and so they are signed to a major league baseball team.

Million Dollar Arms works on all levels. It’s a feel good movie where you are routing for the underdogs and the underdogs prevail. Of course this being a Disney film that will happen. But what makes this movie stand out over others is not just the great acting, the warmth of the Indian people, and the inspirational tone of the film, it’s that Million Dollar Arm is based on a true story.

In 2007, entrepreneurial sports agent JB Bernstein staged a reality show in India to find promising baseball talent amongst the cricket-loving population. In a country of 1.3 billion people, the likelihood of him being successful was very high. Ultimately, Berstein found two ball players – Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel. They not only became an investment but it turned into a real family relationship – just as in the film. Both men were eventually signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Jon Hamm is perfect as a sports agent (he could’ve better played Tom Cruise’s role in Jerry Macguire). Hamm even has the look of a sport agent – he is easily pictured driving a sportscar – along with his combination of frustration, emotion, comedy and sympathy – especially as he gets to know the young men he’s taken under his wing – there is a real emotional bond on camera, and we can assume off camera as well. The roles of Rinku and Dinesh appear to have been an easy choice. As Rinku, Sharma brings a sense of vulnerability to the role. Sharma was just incredible in 2012’s Life of Pi, and in Million Dollar Arm he’s just as good. Mittal was brought in to play Dinesh – he’s famous for playing Salim in the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire. Mittal has practically grown up in front of the camera and it’s good to see that he’s still excelling at acting. Alan Arkin as seasoned scout Ray is the one character in the film poorly portrayed. While Arkin is an Oscar-winning actor who has appeared in many acclaimed films in his career, his Ray character is a bore. He spends most of his time sleeping at the baseball contests waiting until he ‘hears’ a fast ball. It ridiculous to think that a man as successful as Ray would sleep on the job. But the most memorable character is Amit Rohan (Pitobash Tripathy). He steals every scene he is in. At just 5’4″, he’s got lots energy, stamina, drive and confidence. Tripathy’s character brings the film funny and lighthearted moments, especially in his excitedness as JB tells him he’s going back to America with him. While there are times when the filmmakers take stereotypical shots at the Indians and their culture, what makes the movie is exactly that – the Indian culture – the vibrancy, look, feel, sounds, the organized chaos, the beautiful colors and the beautiful people – it’s all there to see on the big screen. Director Craig Gillespie and screenwriter Tom McCarthy bring a true story to a vibrant life on the screen, and while they bring dramatic license to the true events that really took place, Million Dollar Arm is the perfect film.



Million Dollar Arm [DVD] (DVD)

Director: Craig Gillespie
Starring: Jon Hamm, Suraj Sharma, Alan Arkin, Bill Paxton, Aasif Mandvi
Rating: Parental Guidance

Million Dollar Arm
New From: £3.62 GBP In Stock
Used from: £1.93 GBP In Stock

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27th Dec2014

John – Theatre

by timbaros

press a_24 performer_hannes langolf_photographer_hugo glendinningThe term ‘John’ is a word associated with a man who visits prostitutes. It’s also the name of the central character in a show with the same name.

John, now playing at the National Theatre, is an extremely unique theatre experience. The first half of the show is about a man named John. He’s had a hard life, classifies himself as straight, but he goes to gay saunas. The second half of John takes place in a gay sauna where we continue to hear John’s story as well as the stories of other patrons in the sauna, including the owners. So John is a story about men, sex, love, intimacy, and real life.

Lloyd Newson, who conceived, directed, and choreographed John on behalf of DV8 Physical Theatre, had three researchers go to say saunas primarily in London and asked patrons if they were willing to be interviewed. Newson conducted the interviews with just a handful of the men, but one man in particular, John, stood out. And it became clear to Newsom that John would be the central character in his new play.

So the first half of John tells his story. He came from a very disturbed Northern background where his father was a rapist and his mother was an alcoholic. He’d been married, had lots and lots of girlfriends, and two children. He also has a criminal record with 2 convictions. He’s been in prison (where he discovered his homosexuality), homeless for a time, but he turns his life around by getting a degree at the Open University. He goes to saunas to connect to men, not necessarily in a sexual way but more in an emotional way. He wants to be normal, be part of the middle class, be part of a community. And his life is portrayed on stage in a unique way – a revolving stage that revolves as the story is told. Also more unique is that the actors perform physically movements with their entire bodies. They twist and turn and go sideways and bend. And what’s fascinating about this is that they continue to do this the entire show, while at the same time telling the story, bending and moving. So we get a glimpse into John’s life as told by him and he and his fellow actors revolve and bend and tell a story that never once gets boring.

The second half of the show takes place in a gay sauna. There is a very well choreographed bit when three actors constantly undress and dress, several times, but it’s very interesting in how it’s done – it’s al choreographed in a way so that their clothes are moved by another actor to a different area only to be picked up by one of them to get dressed again, and the process repeats itself. We get to meet the owners of the sauna, who tell stories in what they find and put up with in their sauna. ‘They’ tell us that once they found someone dead, a young Portuguese man, and that his mom wanted to pay a visit as she wanted to see where her son had died. They also go into detail about at times finding ‘poo’ in the sauna. It’s actually quite funny when they describe where and how they find it, even in the jacuzzi. There’s also an attendant who gives us a rundown of what’s in the sauna: gloryholes, sling room, so as the stage turns around, we see more of the sauna and more of it’s ‘patrons’. Another man says that he doesn’t care that he’s being reckless or not. And like in any sauna, the men walk around and around and around, ignoring the ones they don’t want to be with and ignoring the ones they want to be with. But it’s the physical movement in the show that makes it very unique. The actors are moving, constantly, in tandem with each other. It’s ballet without the pointy toes.

But John is ultimately about gay men and gay saunas, intimacy and them searching for something they’re not too sure about. And while this show could’ve only been about John’s life story, or a separate show about saunas, John is a show that is so unlike anything you will have seen this year. Kudos not just to Andi Xhuma who plays John but to the entire cast (and Newson) for putting on a show that is really hard to describe but definitely needs to be seen.
John is playing at the National Theatre until January 13, 2015. To buy tickets, click here:
http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/john

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22nd Dec2014

The Circle – Film

by timbaros

images-304The Circle (Der Kreis) is an amazing true story of two men who fall in love in 1956 Zurich, and who are still together today.

Ernst Ostertag and Robi Rapp met through their association with a very underground gay organization and magazine called The Circle. The Circle was a group of gay men who wanted to get together to meet other gay men, and to publish a magazine specifically for the gay community. It was founded in 1942, and included photos of scantily clad men and announcements of get togethers such as costume balls, as well as racier text written in English that the censors were unable to read. It was popular not only in Switzerland but it was smuggled into Germany where it got into the hands of the gay German population who viewed Zurich as a city of gay freedom, but it was hardly that. Many gay Germans, however, would go to Zurich on the weekends to embrace the gay underground scene in that city.
Part documentary, part dramatic recreations, and including interviews with the men associated with Der Kreis, The Circle takes us back to a time when being gay was not accepted. The gay movement in Europe was still reeling from the atrocities of Hitler during WWII, and even in Switzerland it wasn’t very easy being gay. In the movie, Ernst Ostertag (played by Matthias Hungerbuhler) is a teacher about to be certified. He wanders into The Circle offices to volunteer and speaks to Rolf (Anatole Taubman), the ‘father’ of The Circle. At one of The Circle costume balls (where there are lots of scantily clad men posing as Greek statues), he meets Robi Rapp (Sven Schelker), who, dressed as a woman, is the singing entertainment of the evening. Ostertag is immediately smitten, and they fall in love. It’s a love that that they have to keep secret, as Ostertag is not out at work (as most people weren’t during those days). Ostertag evens runs into his boss at the school at a local cruising ground.

Rapp has an understanding mother who knows all about him being gay, so Rapp takes Ostertag to meet her. But Ostertag’s parents are quite the opposite, and when they meet Rapp they speak about everything except their relationship.

The police start to shake down the staff at The Circle after a few gay men are murdered by a hustler, including an in-the-closet well-known music composer. So the police tell Rolf that they can no longer hold their costume balls, but they instead decide to have a gathering in a local bar. Ostertag initially didn’t want to go as his teacher’s certification was about to go through, but he ends up going to see his boyfriend Rapp sing. Unfortunately, the bar gets raided by the police, the men are asked for their ID’s, sent outside, and told to strip, where their private parts were inspected by the police, in front of the local neighbors. Ostertag and Rapp are lucky enough to escape out of a back door.

But nothing can stop Ostertag and Rapp and the love they have for each other. But The Circle magazine is not able to survive, and eventually the magazine ceases operation in 1967. And in this movie Ostertag and Rapp are telling us, their story, 50 years after it had taken place. And as they tell the stories to the camera, the movie goes back to their early era in excellent dramatic recreations. The Circle is centered around their love story, a love story that transcended its time. Theirs became the first officially accepted gay partnership in Switzerland, which they celebrated in 2003. Winner of Audience and Teddy Awards at the Berlin Film Festival this year, The Circle is the Swiss entry for the 87th Academy Awards.

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22nd Dec2014

Lucy – DVD

by timbaros

images-224What if someone unlocks 100 percent of their brain capacity to access the furthest reaches of their mind? In Lucy, Scarlett Johansson’s character does just that, and unleashes a woman who becomes superhuman.

It has always been theorized that humans use only about 10% of their brain capacity at any given time, but with 86 billion densely packed neurons in the brain, humans have the ability and capacity to do so much more. And Lucy is able to do so much more. Johansson is in full action mode as Lucy, a student living in Taipei, Taiwan who is tricked by her boyfriend into delivering a briefcase to an individual she has never met. Before she knows it, a man by the name of Mr. Jang (Choi Min Sik) has his gang drag her into his office where they surgically implant a package loaded with CPH4 – a powerful synthetic substance – nuclear DNA. Mr. Jang plans to send her, along with three other pigeons, to another country with the substance planted inside of them. But his plan goes terribly wrong as the package in Lucy’s abdomen starts leaking, and Lucy begins to feel everything around her – all of her sensations are heightened – and she develops superhuman traits on a scale not ever seen before. As the chemical is kicking in, she escapes her captors to get the chemical compound out of her system to prevent her from dying. But too late – the superhuman Lucy has been unleashed. Slowly her cerebral capacity expands – from 10% to 20% – and she is able to do things she wasn’t able to do before, like beat the gang members up, understand foreign languages, and hearing mobile phone conversations from a distance.
Lucy’s able to get to a hospital where she walks into an operating room and orders the doctor to remove the compound in her abdomen – at gunpoint. During the surgery, for which she declined to use anethesia, she makes a poignant phone call to her mother back in the United States. She tells her mom that she can feel air, vibrations, gravity, that she no longer has any fear, and that she can remember the taste of her mother’s milk when she was a baby. It’s a phone call that may be her last, as Lucy knows her brain functionality is out of control. She still needs to know what is happening with her, so she goes to Paris to enlist the help of Professor Samuel Norman (Morgan Freeman – who gives the film an educational bent when he tells a room full of students facts – one being that species reproduce when there is a favorable environment). Professor Norman has done decades of research on the brain’s potential and is perhaps the only person on Earth who can help Lucy understand what’s happening with her. But Lucy is not satisfied – she wants more CPH4 to hit 100% capacity – she’s addicted to it and can’t get enough. So she tracks down the other pigeons and rips it out of their guts.
But Lucy’s troubles are not over yet. She’s got Mr. Jang on her tail, and him and his gang want the CHP4 back. But getting it from Lucy is going to be impossible. She hooks up with Captain Del Rio (Amr Waked) and together they try to outrun Mr. Jang and his gang in Paris. In one nail-biting car chase, Lucy and Del Rio are engaged in a car chase with Mr. Jang and his gang which takes them through the sidewalks of the famed Rue de Rivoli, next to the Louvre Museum and the Tuileries Garden, packed full of traffic and tourists. It’s an intense car chase with Lucy driving against the traffic in one of Paris’ busiest tourist areas, including driving through a flea market. The clock is ticking against Lucy as her brain capacity continues to grow and her brain cells are reproducing at a rapid rate. From 30%, where Lucy can change her appearance, to 50%, where she can actually see cell phone conversations, and to 90%, where she can go back in time. She’s colonizing her own brain and can’t stop it, so she needs to get to Professor Norman but is up against Mr. Jang and his men, will she get there in time? And what happens when she reaches 100%?
Lucy is a film that is a combination of fact and fiction – the viewer needs to suspend belief in all that is presented but still keep an open mind. Lucy’s plot alluding to CPH4 is a hypothetical one, but it does exist as it is an actual substance that pregnant women produce in the sixth week of natal development. Director and writer Luc Besson (Taken, Taken 2, Le Femme Nikita) creates a film that walks a fine line between theoretical reality and imagination, with a touch of true facts thrown in. Of course, the more Lucy experiences in the film, the more the story becomes fictional. But Johansson makes a perfect Lucy. Physically Johansson is built for the part – muscular, athletic while maintaining her femininity – Johansson can carry a gun and outrun the bad guys at any time. Similar in character to Anne Parillaud’s Nikita, where she fights against the bad men and outruns and outguns them, Johansson’s Lucy can do this and more. And Johansson, whose had an amazing string of hit films over the past two years (including the well-received Under My Skin, Don Jon, and her voice in Her), proves that she is the most capable and versatile actress around who can do action, comedy, adventure, science fiction – anything.
In the beginning of Lucy, we are told that ‘life was given to us a billion years ago, look what we’ve done with it’, with footage of cheetahs, snails, deer and then footage of catastrophe’s – floods, typhoons – natural disasters. And at the end, we’re told  “Life was given to us a billion years ago, now you know what to do with it.”
Lucy is now available to buy on DVD:


Lucy [DVD] [2014] (DVD)

Director: Luc Besson
Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Analeigh Tipton, Morgan Freeman
Rating: Suitable for 15 years and over

Lucy
New From: £1.20 GBP In Stock
Used from: £0.01 GBP In Stock

12th Dec2014

Golden Globe Awards Nominations – Film

by timbaros

images-306The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has announced nominations for the 2015 Golden Globe Awards in all 25 categories. For Best Motion Picture – Drama, film fans can fight over “Boyhood,” “Foxcatcher,” “The Imitation Game,” “Selma” and “The Theory of Everything” to take home the trophy.

On the Comedy/Musical end, the statue will come down to “Birdman,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Into the Woods,” “Pride” and “St. Vincent.”

For the small screen, “Girls,” “Silicon Valley,” “Jane the Virgin,” “Transparent” and “Orange Is the New Black” will duke it out in comedy.

The top TV drama finalists are “House of Cards,” “Game of Thrones,” “The Affair,” “The Good Wife” and “Downton Abbey.”

The press conference, which took place early Thursday at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, unveiling the finalists in 25 TV and film categories. Kate Beckinsale, Paula Patton, Peter Krause, Jeremy Piven, Hollywood Foreign Press Association President Theo Kingma, Dick Clark Productions Executive Producer Barry Adelman and 2015 Miss Golden Globe Greer Grammar took part in the ceremony.

The Tina Fey and Amy Poehler-hosted Golden Globe awards telecast will air on NBC on Jan. 11, 2015.

FILM

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Boyhood”
“Foxcatcher”
“The Imitation Game”
“Selma”
“The Theory of Everything”

Best Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
“Birdman”
“The Grand Budapest Hotel”
“Into the Woods”
“Pride”
“St. Vincent”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Steve Carell, “Foxcatcher”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “Imitation Game”
Jake Gyllenhaal, “Nightcrawler”
David Oyelowo, “Selma”
Eddie Redmayne, “The Theory of Everything”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Jennifer Aniston, “Cake”
Felicity Jones, “The Theory of Everything”
Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”
Rosamund Pike, “Gone Girl”
Reese Witherspoon, “Wild”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Amy Adams, “Big Eyes”
Emily Blunt, “Into the Woods”
Hellen Mirren, “The Hundred-Foot Journey”
Julianne Moore, “Map to the Stars”
Quvenzhane Wallis – “Annie”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Ralph Fiennes, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Michael Keaton, “Birdman”
Bill Murray, “St. Vincent”
Joaquin Phoenix, “Inherent Vice”
Christoph Waltz, “Big Eyes”

Best Performance by an Actress In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”
Jessica Chastain, “A Most Violent Year”
Keira Knightley, “The Imitation Game”
Emma Stone, “Birdman”
Meryl Streep, “Into the Woods”

Best Performance by an Actor In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Robert Duvall, “The Judge”
Ethan Hawke, “Boyhood”
Edward Norton, “Birdman”
Mark Ruffalo, “Foxcatcher”
J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”

Best Director – Motion Picture
Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Avu Duvernay, “Selma”
David Fincher, “Gone Girl”
Alejandro González Iñárritu, “Birdman”
Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
“Birdman”
“Boyhood”
“Gone Girl”
“The Grand Budapest Hotel”
“The Imitation Game”

Best Animated Feature Film
“Big Hero 6”
“The Book Of Life”
“The Boxtrolls”
“How To Train Your Dragon 2”
“The LEGO Movie”

Best Foreign Language Film
“Force Majure” – Sweden
“Gett, the Trial of Viviane Amsalem” – Israel
“Ida” – Poland
“Leviathan” – Russian
“Tangerines” – Estonia Georgia

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“Big Eyes” – “Big Eyes” – Music and Lyrics by: Lana Del Rey
“Glory” – “Selma” – Music and Lyrics by: John Legend, Common
“Mercy Is” – “Noah” – Music and Lyrics by: Patti Smith, Lenny Kaye
“Opportunity” – “Annie” – Music and Lyrics by: Greg Kurstin, Sia Furler, Will Gluck
“Yellow Flicker Beat” – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Pt. 1” Music and Lyrics by: Lorde

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
“Birdman”
“Gone Girl”
“The Imitation Game”
“Interstellar”
“The Theory of Everything”

TELEVISION

Best Television Series – Drama
“The Affair”
“Downton Abbey”
“Game of Thrones”
“The Good Wife”
“House of Cards”

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“Girls”
“Jane the Virgin”
“Orange Is The New Black”
“Silicon Valley”
“Transparent”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television
Martin Freeman, “Fargo”
Mark Ruffalo, “The Normal Heart”
Billy Bob Thornton, “Fargo”
Matthew McConaughey, “True Detective”
Woody Harrelson, “True Detective”

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Claire Danes, “Homeland”
Viola Davis, “How To Get Away With Murder”
Julianna Margulies, “The Good Wife”
Ruth Wilson, “The Affair”
Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Louis C.K., “Louie”
Don Cheadle, “House of Lies”
Rickey Gervais, “Derek”
William H. Macy, “Shameless”
Jeffrey Tambor, “Transparent”

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Lena Dunham, “Girls”
Edie Falco, “Nurse Jackie”
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”
Gina Rodriguez, “Jane the Virgin”
Taylor Schilling, “Orange Is The New Black”

Best Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
“Fargo”
“The Missing”
“The Normal Heart”
“True Detective”
“Olive Kitteridge”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television
Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Honorable Woman”
Jessica Lange, “American Horror Story: Freak Show”
Frances McDormand, “Olive Kitteridge”
Frances O’Connor, “The Missing”
Allison Tolman, “Fargo”

Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series – Drama
Clive Owen, “The Knick”
Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”
Kevin Spacey, “House of Cards”
James Spader, “The Blacklist”
Dominic West, “The Affair”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion
Uzo Aduba, “Orange Is The New Black”
Kathy Bates, “American Horror Story: Freak Show”
Joanne Froggatt, “Downton Abbey”
Allison Janney, “Mom”
Michelle Monaghan, “True Detective”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Matt Bomer, “The Normal Heart”
Alan Cumming, “The Good Wife”
Colin Hanks, “Fargo”
Bill Murray, “Olive Kitteridge”
Jon Voight, “Ray Donovan”
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/in-contention/2015-golden-globe-awards-nominations-complete-list#cFFXUc0JAvUSwiY0.99
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/in-contention/2015-golden-globe-awards-nominations-complete-list#hh0j84mpH78imAXQ.99

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12th Dec2014

Screen Actors Guild Awards Nominations – Film

by timbaros
  • images-305
  • Nominees for the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® for outstanding performances in 2014 in five film and eight television categories, as well as the SAG Awards® honors for outstanding action performances by film and television stunt ensembles were announced this morning in Los Angeles at the Pacific Design Center’s SilverScreen Theater in West Hollywood.

    SAG-AFTRA President Ken Howard introduced Ansel Elgort (“The Fault in Our Stars,” “Divergent”) and actress/director/producer and SAG Award® recipient Eva Longoria, who announced the nominees for this year’s Actors®. SAG Awards® Committee Chair JoBeth Williams and Vice Chair Daryl Anderson announced the stunt ensemble nominees.

    The 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® will be simulcast live nationally on TNT and TBS on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 at 8 p.m. (ET) / 5 p.m. (PT) from the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center. An encore performance will air immediately following on TNT. The SAG Awards® can also be viewed live on the TNT and TBS websites, and also the Watch TNT and Watch TBS apps for iOS or Android (viewers must sign in using their TV service provider user name and password).

  • 21st ANNUAL SCREEN ACTORS GUILD AWARDS NOMINATIONS

THEATRICAL MOTION PICTURES

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
STEVE CARELL / John du Pont – “FOXCATCHER” (Sony Pictures Classics)
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Alan Turing – “THE IMITATION GAME” (The Weinstein Company)
JAKE GYLLENHAAL / Louis Bloom – “NIGHTCRAWLER” (Open Road Films)
MICHAEL KEATON / Riggan – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
EDDIE REDMAYNE / Stephen Hawking – “THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING” (Focus Features)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
JENNIFER ANISTON / Claire Bennett – “CAKE” (Cinelou Films)
FELICITY JONES / Jane Hawking – “THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING” (Focus Features)
JULIANNE MOORE / Alice Howland-Jones – “STILL ALICE” (Sony Pictures Classics)
ROSAMUND PIKE / Amy Dunne – “GONE GIRL” (20th Century Fox)
REESE WITHERSPOON / Cheryl Strayed – “WILD” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
ROBERT DUVALL / Joseph Palmer – “THE JUDGE” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
ETHAN HAWKE / Mason, Sr. – “BOYHOOD” (IFC Films)
EDWARD NORTON / Mike – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
MARK RUFFALO / Dave Schultz – “FOXCATCHER” (Sony Pictures Classics)
J.K. SIMMONS / Fletcher – “WHIPLASH” (Sony Pictures Classics)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
PATRICIA ARQUETTE / Olivia – “BOYHOOD” (IFC Films)
KEIRA KNIGHTLEY / Joan Clarke – “THE IMITATION GAME” (The Weinstein Company)
EMMA STONE / Sam – “BIRDMAN” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
MERYL STREEP / The Witch – “INTO THE WOODS” (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
NAOMI WATTS / Daka – “ST. VINCENT” (The Weinstein Company)

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
BIRDMAN (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
ZACH GALIFIANAKIS / Jake
MICHAEL KEATON / Riggan
EDWARD NORTON / Mike
ANDREA RISEBOROUGH / Laura
AMY RYAN / Sylvia
EMMA STONE / Sam
NAOMI WATTS / Lesley

BOYHOOD (IFC Films)
PATRICIA ARQUETTE / Olivia
ELLAR COLTRANE / Mason
ETHAN HAWKE / Mason, Sr.
LORELEI LINKLATER / Samantha

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
F. MURRAY ABRAHAM / Mr. Moustafa
MATHIEU AMALRIC / Serge X.
ADRIEN BRODY / Dmitri
WILLEM DAFOE / Jopling
RALPH FIENNES / M. Gustave
JEFF GOLDBLUM / Dep. Kovacs
HARVEY KEITEL / Ludwig
JUDE LAW / Young Writer
BILL MURRAY / M. Ivan
EDWARD NORTON / Henckels
TONY REVOLORI / Zero
SAOIRSE RONAN / Agatha
JASON SCHWARTZMAN / M. Jean
LÉA SEYDOUX / Clotilde
TILDA SWINTON / Madame D
TOM WILKINSON / Author
OWEN WILSON / M. Chuck

THE IMITATION GAME (The Weinstein Company)
MATTHEW BEARD / Peter Hilton
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Alan Turing
CHARLES DANCE / Commander Denniston
MATTHEW GOODE / Hugh Alexander
RORY KINNEAR / Nock
KEIRA KNIGHTLEY / Joan Clarke
ALLEN LEECH / John Cairncross
MARK STRONG / Stewart Menzies

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING (Focus Features)
CHARLIE COX / Jonathan Hellyer Jones
FELICITY JONES / Jane Hawking
SIMON McBURNEY / Frank Hawking
EDDIE REDMAYNE / Stephen Hawking
DAVID THEWLIS / Dennis Sciama
EMILY WATSON / Beryl Wilde

TELEVISION PROGRAMS

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
ADRIEN BRODY / Harry Houdini – “HOUDINI” (History)
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH / Sherlock Holmes – “SHERLOCK: HIS LAST VOW” (PBS)
RICHARD JENKINS / Henry Kitteridge – “OLIVE KITTERIDGE” (HBO)
MARK RUFFALO / Ned Weeks – “THE NORMAL HEART” (HBO)
BILLY BOB THORNTON / Lorne Malvo – “FARGO” (FX)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
ELLEN BURSTYN / Olivia Foxworth – “FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC” (Lifetime)
MAGGIE GYLLENHAAL / Nessa Stein – “THE HONORABLE WOMAN” (Sundance TV)
FRANCES McDORMAND / Olive Kitteridge – “OLIVE KITTERIDGE” (HBO)
JULIA ROBERTS / Dr. Emma Brookner – “THE NORMAL HEART” (HBO)
CICELY TYSON / Carrie Watts – “THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL” (Lifetime)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
STEVE BUSCEMI / Enoch “Nucky” Thompson – “BOARDWALK EMPIRE” (HBO)
PETER DINKLAGE / Tyrion Lannister – “GAME OF THRONES” (HBO)
WOODY HARRELSON / Martin Hart – “TRUE DETECTIVE” (HBO)
MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY / Rust Cohle – “TRUE DETECTIVE” (HBO)
KEVIN SPACEY / Francis Underwood – “HOUSE OF CARDS” (Netflix)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series (6 nominees)
CLAIRE DANES / Carrie Mathison – “HOMELAND” (Showtime)
VIOLA DAVIS / Annalise Keating – “HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER” (ABC)
JULIANNA MARGULIES / Alicia Florrick – “THE GOOD WIFE” (CBS)
TATIANA MASLANY / Sarah/Cosima/Alison/Rachel/Helena/Tony/Jennifer and Various Others – “ORPHAN BLACK” (BBC America)
MAGGIE SMITH / Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham – “DOWNTON ABBEY” (PBS)
ROBIN WRIGHT / Claire Underwood – “HOUSE OF CARDS” (Netflix)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
TY BURRELL / Phil Dunphy – “MODERN FAMILY ” (ABC)
LOUIS C.K. / Louie – “LOUIE” (FX)
WILLIAM H. MACY / Frank Gallagher – “SHAMELESS” (Showtime)
JIM PARSONS / Sheldon Cooper – “THE BIG BANG THEORY” (CBS)
ERIC STONESTREET / Cameron Tucker – “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
UZO ADUBA / Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren – “ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” (Netflix)
JULIE BOWEN / Claire Dunphy – “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)
EDIE FALCO / Jackie Peyton – “NURSE JACKIE” (Showtime)
JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS / Vice President Selina Meyer – “VEEP” (HBO)
AMY POEHLER / Leslie Knope – “PARKS AND RECREATION” (NBC)

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
BOARDWALK EMPIRE (HBO)
STEVE BUSCEMI / Enoch “Nucky” Thompson
PAUL CALDERON / Arquimedes
NICHOLAS CALHOUN / Sean
LOUIS CANCELMI / Mike D’Angelo
JOHN ELLISON CONLEE / Commodore
MICHAEL COUNTRYMAN / Frank Wilson
STEPHEN GRAHAM / Al Capone
DOMENICK LOMBARDOZZI / Ralph Capone
NOLAN LYONS / Enoch Thompson (young)
KELLY MACDONALD / Margaret Thompson
BORIS McGIVER / Sheriff Smith Johnson
VINCENT PIAZZA / Charlie “Lucky” Luciano
PAUL SPARKS / Mickey Doyle
TRAVIS TOPE / Joe Hardy
SHEA WHIGHAM / Eli Thompson
ANATOL YUSEF / Meyer Lansky
MICHAEL ZEGEN / Benny Siegel

DOWNTON ABBEY (PBS)
HUGH BONNEVILLE / Robert, Earl of Grantham
LAURA CARMICHAEL / Lady Edith Crawley
JIM CARTER / Mr. Carson
BRENDAN COYLE / Mr. Bates
MICHELLE DOCKERY / Lady Mary Crawley
KEVIN DOYLE / Mr. Molesley
JOANNE FROGGATT / Anna Bates
LILY JAMES / Lady Rose
ROBERT JAMES-COLLIER / Thomas Barrow
ALLEN LEECH / Tom Branson
PHYLLIS LOGAN / Mrs. Hughes
ELIZABETH McGOVERN / Cora, Countess of Grantham
SOPHIE McSHERA / Daisy
MATT MILNE / Alfred
LESLEY NICOL / Mrs. Patmore
DAVID ROBB / Dr. Clarkson
MAGGIE SMITH / Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham
ED SPELEERS / Jimmy Kent
CARA THEOBOLD / Ivy
PENELOPE WILTON / Isobel Crawley

GAME OF THRONES (HBO)
JOSEF ALTIN / Pyp
JACOB ANDERSON / Grey Worm
JOHN BRADLEY / Samwell Tarly
DOMINIC CARTER / Janos Slynt
GWENDOLINE CHRISTIE / Brienne of Tarth
EMILIA CLARKE / Daenerys Targaryen
NIKOLAJ COSTER-WALDAU / Jaime Lannister
BEN CROMPTON / Dolorous Edd
CHARLES DANCE / Tywin Lannister
PETER DINKLAGE / Tyrion Lannister
NATALIE DORMER / Margaery Tyrell
NATHALIE EMMANUEL / Missandei
IAIN GLEN / Ser Jorah Mormont
JULIAN GLOVER / Pycelle
KIT HARINGTON / Jon Snow
LENA HEADEY / Cersei Lannister
CONLETH HILL / Varys
RORY McCANN / Sandor “The Hound” Clegane
IAN McELHINNEY / Ser Barristan Selmy
PEDRO PASCAL / Oberyn Martell
DANIEL PORTMAN / Podrick Payne
MARK STANLEY / Grenn
SOPHIE TURNER / Sansa Stark
MAISIE WILLIAMS / Arya Stark

HOMELAND (Showtime)
NUMAN ACAR / Hassan Haqqani
NAZANIN BONIADI / Fara Sherazi
CLAIRE DANES / Carrie Mathison
RUPERT FRIEND / Peter Quinn
RAZA JAFFREY / Aasar Khan
NIMRAT KAUR / Tasneem Qureishi
TRACY LETTS / Sen. Andrew Lockhart
MARK MOSES / Dennis Boyd
MICHAEL O’KEEFE / John Redmond
MANDY PATINKIN / Saul Berenson
LAILA ROBINS / Martha Boyd
MAURY STERLING / Max

HOUSE OF CARDS (Netflix)
MAHERSHALA ALI / Remy Danton
JAYNE ATKINSON / Catherine Durant
RACHEL BROSNAHAN / Rachel Posner
DEREK CECIL / Seth Grayson
NATHAN DARROW / Edward Meechum
MICHEL GILL / President Walker
JOANNA GOING / Tricia Walker
SAKINA JAFFREY / Linda Vasquez
MICHAEL KELLY / Doug Stamper
MOZHAN MARNÒ / Ayla Sayyad
GERALD McRANEY / Raymond Tusk
MOLLY PARKER / Jackie Sharp
JIMMI SIMPSON / Gavin Orsay
KEVIN SPACEY / Francis Underwood
ROBIN WRIGHT / Claire Underwood

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
THE BIG BANG THEORY (CBS)
MAYIM BIALIK / Amy Farrah Fowler
KALEY CUOCO-SWEETING / Penny
JOHNNY GALECKI / Leonard Hofstadter
SIMON HELBERG / Howard Wolowitz
KUNAL NAYYAR / Rajesh Koothrappali
JIM PARSONS / Sheldon Cooper
MELISSA RAUCH / Bernadette Rostenkowski-Wolowitz

BROOKLYN NINE-NINE (FOX)
STEPHANIE BEATRIZ / Det. Rosa Diaz
DIRK BLOCKER / Hitchcock
ANDRE BRAUGHER / Capt. Ray Holt
TERRY CREWS / Sgt. Terry Jeffords
MELISSA FUMERO / Det. Amy Santiago
JOE LO TRUGLIO / Det. Charles Boyle
JOEL McKINNON MILLER / Scully
CHELSEA PERETTI / Gina Linetti
ANDY SAMBERG / Det. Jake Peralta

MODERN FAMILY (ABC)
AUBREY ANDERSON EMMONS / Lily Tucker-Pritchett
JULIE BOWEN / Claire Dunphy
TY BURRELL / Phil Dunphy
JESSE TYLER FERGUSON / Mitchell Pritchett
NOLAN GOULD / Luke Dunphy
SARAH HYLAND / Haley Dunphy
ED O’NEILL / Jay Pritchett
RICO RODRIGUEZ / Manny Delgado
ERIC STONESTREET / Cameron Tucker
SOFIA VERGARA / Gloria Delgado-Pritchett
ARIEL WINTER / Alex Dunphy

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK (Netflix)
UZO ADUBA / Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren
JASON BIGGS / Larry Bloom
DANIELLE BROOKS / Tasha “Taystee” Jefferson
LAVERNE COX / Sophia Burset
JACKIE CRUZ / Flaca
CATHERINE CURTIN / Wanda Bell
LEA DELARIA / Carrie “Big Boo” Black
BETH FOWLER / Sister Ingalls
YVETTE FREEMAN / Irma
GERMAR TERRELL GARDNER / Charles Ford
KIMIKO GLENN / Brook Soso
ANNIE GOLDEN / Norma Romano
DIANE GUERRERO / Maritza Ramos
MICHAEL J. HARNEY / Ofc. Sam Healy
VICKY JEUDY / Janae Watson
JULIE LAKE / Angie Rice
LAUREN LAPKUS / Susan Fischer
SELENIS LEYVA / Gloria Mendoza
NATASHA LYONNE / Nicky Nichols
TARYN MANNING / Tiffany “Pennsatucky” Doggett
JOEL MARSH GARLAND / Scott O’Neill
MATT McGORRY / Ofc. John Bennett
ADRIENNE C. MOORE / Black Cindy
KATE MULGREW / Galina “Red” Reznikov
EMMA MYLES / Leanne Taylor
JESSICA PIMENTEL / Maria Ruiz
DASCHA POLANCO / Dayanara Diaz
ALYSIA REINER / Natalie “Fig” Figueroa
JUDITH ROBERTS / Taslitz
ELIZABETH RODRIGUEZ / Aleida Diaz
BARBARA ROSENBLAT / Miss Rosa
NICK SANDOW / Joe Caputo
ABIGAIL SAVAGE / Gina
TAYLOR SCHILLING / Piper Chapman
CONSTANCE SHULMAN / Yoga Jones
DALE SOULES / Frieda
YAEL STONE / Lorna Morello
LORRAINE TOUSSAINT / Yvonne “Vee” Parker
LIN TUCCI / Anita DeMarco
SAMIRA WILEY / Poussey Washington

VEEP (HBO)
SUFE BRADSHAW / Sue Wilson
ANNA CHLUMSKY / Amy Brookheimer
GARY COLE / Kent Davidson
KEVIN DUNN / Ben Cafferty
TONY HALE / Gary Walsh
JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS / Vice President Selina Meyer
REID SCOTT / Dan Egan
TIMOTHY SIMONS / Jonah Ryan
MATT WALSH / Mike McLintock

SAG AWARDS HONORS FOR STUNT ENSEMBLES

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
“FURY” (Columbia Pictures)
“GET ON UP” (Universal Pictures)
“THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
“UNBROKEN” (Universal Pictures)
“X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST” (20th Century Fox)

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series (6 nominees)
“24: LIVE ANOTHER DAY” (FOX)
“BOARDWALK EMPIRE” (HBO)
“GAME OF THRONES” (HBO)
“HOMELAND” (Showtime)
“SONS OF ANARCHY” (FX)
“THE WALKING DEAD” (AMC)

LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Screen Actors Guild 51st Annual Life Achievement Award
DEBBIE REYNOLDS

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06th Dec2014

Hockney – Film

by timbaros

Hockney426x317_586f5a66dbb77510ed9cb21a1762924bDavid Hockney is considered to be one of the most significant artists of our generation. He’s been creating art since the 1960’s and, believe it or not, he is still at it today. His life is explored in the new documentary Hockney, to be released on November 28th.

Hockney was born in Bradford, UK in 1937. He graduated from the Bradford School of Art in 1957 and then studied at the Royal College of Art from 1959 – 1962. He was instrumental in the founding of the British Pop Are movement. In the documentary, Hockney gives complete access of his life – his personal archive of photographs, paintings, and films – with family members and close personal friends speaking about him as well.

Hockney’s art is very visual, very abstract, and he has been able to transcend the changes in the art world for over half a century. He’s been a success, but throughout his life he has struggled with his art, relationships, and the tragedy of AIDS.

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Hockney was brought up in the time of austerity, and his first memories are of him hiding under the stairs during the WWII air raids. When he was young, his father told him ‘not to worry too much what the neighbors think’ and this might’ve set the tone for his art. He also loved going to the cinema – Hockney mentions in the documentary that painting and cinema have a much closer relationship than people realise. Hockney’s first time out of the UK was when he set off to New York City – where he had $350 to last him for two months. We are shown quite a few scenes of modern New York City which seem irrelevant to the era in which Hockney arrived. In 1964 he moved to Los Angeles and it was his time there where he produced his most memorable art – images of swimming pools and the people in them. His art was also very blatantly gay as Hockney was not shy about painting art that basically reflected his life.

But Hockey the documentary doesn’t show us his life story in chronological order. It goes back and forth between showing home videos of him with friends, present day Hockney musing on his life, friends from the yesteryear reminiscing about pivotal events in Hockney’s life, his sister Margaret discussing the time when they were children, and near the end of the documentary there is a three minute tribute to his mother, who passed away in 1999 at the age of 99. So Hockney in that sense is a bit confusing because it doesn’t follow any order, it’s just a series of talking heads (including Hockney’s) interspersed with his work.

It is the art shown in the film that is breathtaking. Hockney created two very different landscapes for his work – the vast bright colorful spaces of California and the dark, moody hills of East Yorkshire. His work would start with a photograph, and from then he would reproduce it as a print, including friends and acquaintances in some of his paintings – some of whom discuss their memories posing for Hockney.

Some of his work shown in the film includes his ‘We Two Boys Together Clinging,’ an oil on board painting showing two men clinging to each other. ‘Pacific Mutual Life’ is another one of his earlier works and it is just that – a painting of the Pacific Mutual Life Building in Los Angeles. One of his most famous works is “A Bigger Splash,’ simply an unseen diver already in the water, the remnants of his splash backdropped by the beautiful house with palm trees and terribly blue skies. Every one of Hockney’s painting tells a story from his life.

‘Peter Getting out of the Pool’ also stuck with this same motif – showing Hockney’s then boyfriend Peter Schlesinger literally getting out of the pool, naked, with the ripples of the water drawn by Hockey to look like squiggly lines. When the themes weren’t about pools or homosexuality, Hockney liked to paint people. ‘Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy’ (1970) shows two friends posing in their living room. Hockney for some strange reason could not paint Mr. Percey’s feet so he had him burrow them in the deep shag carpet.

But David Hockney comes off as lonely. He has had bouts of depression during his lifetime, especially after the death of his best friend Henry Geldzahler – who passed away in 1994 of cancer. They were soul mates, travelling together, working together, and practically living together. Henry, who worked in the art world as a curator, is shown in bed with Hockney, cuddling, and also shown at a beach house where he and Hockney would escape to be creative. Also AIDS entered into Hockney’s like, and his friends say that it shook him to it’s core. Hockney, who is free of the virus, says in the documentary that he lost two-thirds of his friends to the disease.

But Hockney always reinvents himself. His interest in films and photography grew into almost an obsession. He was one of the first artists to optically produce images, creating paintings that begun as a series of photographs taken from different angles of a single subject into one single piece of work – it’s a technique no else had ever done so successfully before. And Hockney has had a very successful life and career as an artist. And it’s hard to believe that at age 77 he is still working in the studio seven days a week.

Director Randall Wright was very fortunate in two respects in the making of this documentary; that Hockney was still alive, and that he fully cooperated with him for this documentary. Hockney gave Wright free reign to do whatever he wanted with his personal archives – the first time Hockney has ever done so. Hockney even gave Wright permission to use the many unseen experiments with film and video and his early still photographs. This is not the first time that Wright has worked with Hockney. In 2003 he directed ‘David Hockney: Secret Knowledge,’ which explored Hockney’s theory that artists have been using optical devices since the 15th century. But in Hockney, it’s all about the man, and the myth. But perhaps Wright is too close to his subject and has known him for a long time because after watching Hockney I still felt that I didn’t really understand him and felt like I had just been given a video tour of his art – abstract to a point of not knowing what to make of it. And at the end of the documentary, we see Hockney aimlessly walking around his house, not giving much of a dramatic ending to this film.

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06th Dec2014

Made in Dagenham – Theatre

by timbaros

Made-In-Dagenham-2-Photo-Credit-Alex-James-1Gemma Arterton is terrific as a mother of two small children who rally her co-workers to strike for equal pay in the West End’s newist musical Made in Dagenham.

Rita O’Grady (Arterton) works in a Ford factory in Dagenham along with some very colorful co-workers. These include tiny Sandra (Sophie Isaacs) who has a huge singing voice, wanna be airline pilot Cass (Naana Agyei-Ampadu), and sassy Barbara (Sophie Louise-Dunn).

Management at the factory have deemed the women unskilled workers, which means lower and not equal pay, and they are not happy about it. So Rita becomes the unexpected spokeswoman for the group, affecting her relationship with her husband Eddie (Adrian Der Gregorian), who is not happy that his wife is practically never home now to mind him and their adorable two small kids.

Rita is mentored by union rep Connie (Isla Blair), but when she gets sick, it’s up to Rita to attend official union meetings, meet government officials, and, ultimately, to speak at the Trade Union Conference, is at the end of the show.

Made in Dagenham doesn’t veer too far away from the film of the same name that was released in 2010. But the film worked much better as it was able to take the story to a real factory, to show the women protesting outdoors, to meetings in government building, making the era that it represents (the late 1960’s) more realistic. There are quite a few faults with this musical stage version: a plot about Rita’s son being caned in school goes nowhere, jokes by Mark Hadfield playing a buffoonish Prime Minister Harold Wilson are so bad – and mostly misogynistic, and Isaacs, who has such an amazing singing voice, only gets to sing one song in the beginning of the show, and she is wasted during an awful bit in the show that is supposed to be a car commercial. And the American boss of Ford (Steve Furst) is portrayed as a singing cowboy, complete with cowboy hat and and a good ole U.S.A. song called, appropriately enough, ‘This is America,’ just plain awful.

However, Rupert Gould’s sets are amazing. The reproduction of a car factory is always in motion, down to the very minor details, including the nuts and bolts that go into the cars. The acting by the whole cast is very good, but what they are given to work with is a musical with not one memorable song (music by David Arnold), and a book (by Richard Bean) that doesn’t have much of a story.

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